Nature Play Week: Connecting Children with the Outdoors

Nature Play Week is an annual initiative that encourages children to spend more time outside, reconnect with nature, and ultimately develop important skills like creativity and problem solving. Find out how you can get involved!
Nature Play Week is an annual initiative that encourages children to spend more time outside, reconnect with nature, and ultimately develop important skills like creativity and problem solving. Find out how you can get involved!

Nature Play Week is a nationwide initiative in Australia that encourages children and families to spend more time outdoors, connecting with nature.

It is held annually, April 17-30th, and provides a range of nature-based activities and events in which children can participate.

This year, Nature Play Week is even more important as we continue to navigate the ongoing pandemic, which has disrupted children's usual routines and made it even harder for them to spend time outdoors.

Who organises Nature Play Week?

The Kids in Nature Network is responsible for running Nature Play Week.

This network is made up of various organisations and individuals who are passionate about reconnecting children with nature.

They work together to organise and promote events across the country during the two weeks of Nature Play Week.

What is its purpose?

The primary purpose of Nature Play Week is to promote the importance of outdoor play and its benefits for children's health and wellbeing.

Children are spending less time outside than ever before, and this has led to concerns about the impact on their physical, mental, and emotional development.

By encouraging children to spend more time outdoors and engaging in nature-based activities, they are able to develop important skills, such as problem-solving and creativity, and develop a greater appreciation for the natural world.

Traveling is a fantastic way to encourage more time outdoors, and promotes a vast range of positive developmental impacts on childhood development.

How can I get involved?

There are many ways to get involved in Nature Play Week.

Parents, caregivers, and educators can organise their own nature-based activities and events, such as nature walks, scavenger hunts, or building a den. These activities can be as simple or elaborate as you like, and the aim is to encourage children to spend time outside, exploring and having fun.

You can also attend one of the many events and activities that are organised by the Kids in Nature Network and other organisations. These events can range from guided nature walks to outdoor craft activities and are suitable for children of all ages.

Getting involved in Nature Play Week is a great way to inspire children to connect with nature and appreciate the outdoors.

Parents and caregivers can use this opportunity to teach their children about the natural world and the importance of environmental conservation.

Nature Play Week can also be a great way for families to spend quality time together and create lasting memories.

Final thoughts

Nature Play Week is a fantastic initiative that encourages children to spend more time outside and reconnect with nature.

It is organised by the Kids in Nature Network and runs annually from the 17th to the 30th of April.

The aim is to promote the benefits of outdoor play and encourage children to engage in nature-based activities.

By participating in Nature Play Week, children can develop important skills, foster creativity and problem-solving abilities, and develop a deeper appreciation for the natural world.

Here at Australia Wide First Aid, we’re dedicated to helping you protect your child’s safety and wellbeing. You can attend a general or childcare first aid course, to proactively safeguard your child’s wellbeing and know how to respond in a crisis.

We have locations across most places in Australia.

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